Intute podcasts

This page archives contents originally published at: www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/

Podcasts

Intute periodically conducts interviews with prominent researchers to keep informed of the latest news and developments in their fields. The interviews are intended to be of interest both to specialists and the broader education community alike. They are available here in the form of 'podcasts' - audio files that may be downloaded or listened to online using any one of the several media players that can play MP3 files.

At present, there are six archaeology podcasts to listen to.

 

Archaeological Sciences III - DNA and Archaeology (2007-11-13)

http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/kb3.mp3.

In the third of his series of interviews about the archaeological sciences, Dr. Andrea Vianello interviews Keri Brown of Manchester University about the use of DNA evidence in archaeological research.

Brown describes what can be done with ancient DNA, what cannot be done, and what issues one needs to bear in mind when analysing DNA.

This podcast is accompanied by slides, which may be viewed at http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/slides/brown/.

Keri Brown
Archaeological Sciences II - Archaeobotany

http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/deMoulins.mp3.

In his second podcast on Archaeological Sciences, Dr. Andrea Vianello talks to Dr. Dominique de Moulins about archaeobiology.

Dr. de Moulins introduces some of the techniques for retrieving and isolating biological materials during excavations, discusses the various environments in which archaeobiologists work, and advises how to analyze the residues found.

This podcast is accompanied by some slides, which may be viewed at http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/slides/demoulins/.

Dr. Dominique de Moulins
Archaeological Sciences (2007-06-28)

http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/tykot.mp3.

Dr. Andrea Vianello interviews professor Robert Tykot of the University of South Florida on his applications of scientific analysis to archaeological research.

This is the first of an intended series of podcasts on archaeological sciences, encouraging archaeologists to consider the possibilities presented by new technologies and scientific analysis.

Andrea's full introduction may be read here.

This podcast is accompanied by slides, which may be viewed at http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/slides/tykot/.

[This podcast has been updated.]

Prof. Robert Tycot
GIS and Archaeology (2007-05-10)

http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/gis.mp3.

Prof. Pedar W. Foss Dr. Andrea Vianello speaks with Professor Pedar W. Foss, one of the principal investigators of the Mediterranean Archaeology Geographic Information System (MAGIS) project, about the use of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) in archaeology. Andrea asks if archaeologists are ready for GIS, and how GIS data can be applied to practical ends.

Take a look here for the full story.

Dr. Andrea Vianello
Roman Provincial Coinage Online Presentation (2007-02-21)

http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ltg/events/podcast/RomanCoins_21_02_2007.mp3.

This is an audio recording of a presentation delivered to Oxford University Computing Services about a new website launched by the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. The AHRC-funded Roman Provincial Coinage Online is one the finest numismatics websites on the Internet. It comprises over 13,000 coin types, and features over 9,000 specimen images along with interactive maps and linked tutorials.

The presentation is delivered by Professor Christopher Howgego and Dr. Volker Heuchert.

The website itself is hosted at http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/.

[NOT AVAILABLE]

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Stonehenge (2007-02-15)

http://www.intute.ac.uk/podcasts/stonehenge.mp3.

Prof. Mike Parker-Pearson Professor Mike Parker-Pearson is the project leader of the current excavations at Durrington Walls, near Stonehenge in Wiltshire. Here he discusses the excavations and what they can tell us about Stonehenge itself with Intute's redoubtable archaeology cataloguer, Dr. Andrea Vianello. Andrea also talks to Dr. Umberto Albarella, the archaeozoologist of the project, who provides his own perspective after studying the conspicuous assemblage of animal bones found at Durrington Walls.> Umberto Albarella